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Saturday, October 31, 2009

the BOOne family

Way to go mom...I was on the floor laughing when I saw this one


Try JibJab Sendables® eCards today!


Do What You Do      Hallelujah Hollaback      ...blackhercules21...

Happy Halloween

I'm not going to really get to celebrate Halloween this year because we have a game tomorrow, and that's okay with me because the stress of finding the right costume is something I can do without right about now. But IF I were to dress up this year, this would be my list of top Halloween choices

Something Throwback


(it's been a dream since childhood, unfortunately I"ve never had 4 friends willing to dress up with me)

Something Inappropriate


(like the d*ck in the Pizza Box, I'd need a bigger box though)

Something Current


(but I never know if it's too soon)

Something Classic


(two in the pink one in the stink is always funny)



Do What You Do      Hallelujah Hollaback      ...blackhercules21...

Friday, October 30, 2009

Should I Buy This Book?

I didn't want to buy this book until I read this excerpt. Now I'm not allowed to bad mouth referees on here because it's a public blog and I've done my fair share of reffing (NYU intramurals). It's not an easy thing to do, but to say that this stuff surprises me would be a lie. The NBA doesn't want me to read this book, but I'm going to anyway.

Here are excerpts from Tim Donaghy's Blowing The Whistle, thank you deadspin.com




On gambling refs:
To have a little fun at the expense of the worst troublemakers, the referees working the game would sometimes make a modest friendly wager amongst themselves: first ref to give one of the bad boys a technical foul wouldn't have to tip the ball boy that night. In the NBA, ball boys set up the referees' locker room and keep it stocked with food and beer for the postgame meal. We usually ran the kid ragged with a variety of personal requests and then slipped him a $20 bill. Technically, the winner of the bet won twice-he didn't have to pay the kid and he got to call a T on Mr. Foul-Mouthed Big-Shot Du Jour.
After the opening tip, it was hilarious as the three of us immediately focused our full attention on the intended victim, waiting for something, anything, to justify a technical foul. If the guy so much as looked at one of us and mumbled, we rang him up. Later in the referees' locker room, we would down a couple of brews, eat some chicken wings, and laugh like hell.
We had another variation of this gag simply referred to as the "first foul of the game" bet. While still in the locker room before tip-off, we would make a wager on which of us would call the game's first foul. That referee would either have to pay the ball boy or pick up the dinner tab for the other two referees. Sometimes, the ante would be $50 a guy. Like the technical foul bet, it was hilarious-only this time we were testing each other's nerves to see who had the guts to hold out the longest before calling a personal foul. There were occasions when we would hold back for two or three minutes-an eternity in an NBA game-before blowing the whistle. It didn't matter if bodies were flying all over the place; no fouls were called because no one wanted to lose the bet.
We played this little game during the regular season and summer league. After a game, all three refs would gather around the VCR and watch a replay of the game. Early in the contest, the announcers would say, "Holy cow! They're really letting them play tonight!" If they only knew...
During one particular summer game, Duke Callahan, Mark Wunderlich, and I made it to the three-minute mark in the first quarter without calling a foul. We were running up and down the court, laughing our asses off as the players got hammered with no whistles. The players were exhausted from the nonstop running when Callahan finally called the first foul because Mikki Moore of the New Jersey Nets literally tackled an opposing player right in front of him. Too bad for Callahan-he lost the bet.
I became so good at this game that if an obvious foul was committed right in front of me, I would call a travel or a three-second violation instead. Those violations are not personal fouls, so I was still in the running to win the bet. The players would look at me with disbelief on their faces as if to say, "What the hell was that?"
On star treatment:


Relationships between NBA players and referees were generally all over the board-love, hate, and everything in-between. Some players, even very good ones, were targeted by referees and the league because they were too talented for their own good. Raja Bell, formerly of the Phoenix Suns and now a member of the Charlotte Bobcats, was one of those players. A defensive specialist throughout his career, Bell had a reputation for being a "star stopper." His defensive skills were so razor sharp that he could shut down a superstar, or at least make him work for his points. Kobe Bryant was often frustrated by Bell's tenacity on defense. Let's face it, no one completely shuts down a player of Kobe's caliber, but Bell could frustrate Kobe, take him out of his game, and interrupt his rhythm.
You would think that the NBA would love a guy who plays such great defense. Think again! Star stoppers hurt the promotion of marquee players. Fans don't pay high prices to see players like Raja Bell-they pay to see superstars like Kobe Bryant score 40 points. Basketball purists like to see good defense, but the NBA wants the big names to score big points.
If a player of Kobe's stature collides with the likes of Raja Bell, the call will almost always go for Kobe and against Bell. As part of our ongoing training and game preparation, NBA referees regularly receive game-action video tape from the league office. Over the years, I have reviewed many recorded hours of video involving Raja Bell. The footage I analyzed usually illustrated fouls being called against Bell, rarely for him. The message was subtle but clear-call fouls against the star stopper because he's hurting the game.
If Kobe Bryant had two fouls in the first or second quarter and went to the bench, one referee would tell the other two, "Kobe's got two fouls. Let's make sure that if we call a foul on him, it's an obvious foul, because otherwise he's gonna go back to the bench. If he is involved in a play where a foul is called, give the foul to another player."
Similarly, when games got physically rough, we would huddle up and agree to tighten the game up. So we started calling fouls on guys who didn't really matter-"ticky-tack" or "touch" fouls where one player just touched another but didn't really impede his progress. Under regular circumstances these wouldn't be fouls, but after a skirmish we wanted to regain control. We would never call these types of fouls on superstars, just on the average players who didn't have star status. It was important to keep the stars on the floor.
Allen Iverson provides a good example of a player who generated strong reaction, both positive and negative, within the corps of NBA referees. For instance, veteran referee Steve Javie hated Allen Iverson and was loathe [sic] to give him a favorable call. If Javie was on the court when Iverson was playing, I would always bet on the other team to win or at least cover the spread. No matter how many times Iverson hit the floor, he rarely saw the foul line. By contrast, referee Joe Crawford had a grandson who idolized Iverson. I once saw Crawford bring the boy out of the stands and onto the floor during warm-ups to meet the superstar. Iverson and Crawford's grandson were standing there, shaking hands, smiling, talking about all kinds of things. If Joe Crawford was on the court, I was pretty sure Iverson's team would win or at least cover the spread.
Madison Square Garden was the place to be for a marquee matchup between the Miami Heat and New York Knicks. I worked the game with Derrick Stafford and Gary Zielinski, knowing that the Knicks were a sure bet to get favorable treatment that night. Derrick Stafford had a close relationship with Knicks coach Isiah Thomas, and he despised Heat coach Pat Riley. I picked the Knicks without batting an eye and settled in for a roller-coaster ride on the court.
During pregame warm-ups, Shaquille O'Neal approached Stafford and asked him to let some air out of the ball.
"Is this the game ball?" O'Neal asked. "It's too hard. C'mon, D, let a little air out of it."
Stafford then summoned one of the ball boys, asked for an air needle, and let some air out of the ball, getting a big wink and a smile from O'Neal.
On his fellow referees:
Dick Bavetta

Crawford wanted the game over quickly so he could kick back, relax, and have a beer; [Dick Bavetta] wanted it to keep going so he could hear his name on TV. He actually paid an American Airlines employee to watch all the games he worked and write down everything the TV commentators said about him. No matter how late the game was over, he'd wake her up for a full report. He loved the attention.
I remember one nightmarish game I worked with Joe Crawford and Phil Robinson. Minnesota and New Orleans were in a tight game going into the last minute, and Crawford told us to make sure that we were 100 percent sure of the call every time we blew the whistle. When play resumed, Minnesota coach Flip Saunders started yelling at us to make a call. Robinson got intimidated and blew the whistle on New Orleans. The only problem was it wasn't the right call. Tim Floyd, the Hornets' coach, went nuts. He stormed the court and kicked the ball into the top row of the stadium. Robinson had to throw him out, and Minnesota won the game.
[...]
Later that week, Ronnie Nunn told me that we could have made something up at the other end against Minnesota to even things out. He even got specific-maybe we should have considered calling a traveling violation on Kevin Garnett. Talk about the politics of the game! Of course the official statement from the league office will always read, "There is no such thing as a makeup call."
That very first time Jack and I bet on an NBA game, Dick was on the court. The team we picked lost the game, but it covered the large point spread and that's how we won the money. Because of the matchup that night, I had some notion of who might win the game, but that's not why I was confident enough to pull the trigger and pick the other team. The real reason I picked the losing team was that I was just about certain they would cover the spread, no matter how badly they played. That is where Dick Bavetta comes into the picture.
From my earliest involvement with Bavetta, I learned that he likes to keep games close, and that when a team gets down by double-digit points, he helps the players save face. He accomplishes this act of mercy by quietly, and frequently, blowing the whistle on the team that's having the better night. Team fouls suddenly become one-sided between the contestants, and the score begins to tighten up. That's the way Dick Bavetta referees a game-and everyone in the league knew it.
Fellow referee Danny Crawford attended Michael Jordan's Flight School Camp years ago and later told me that he had long conversations with other referees and NBA players about how Bavetta propped up weak teams. Danny told me that Jordan himself said that everyone in the league knew that Bavetta cheated in games and that the players and coaches just hoped he would be cheating for them on game night. Cheating? That's a very strong word to use in any sentence that includes the name Dick Bavetta. Is the conscious act of helping a team crawl back into a contest "cheating"? The credo of referees from high school to the NBA is "call them like you see them." Of course, that's a lot different than purposely calling more fouls against one team as opposed to another. Did Bavetta have a hidden agenda? Or was he the ultimate company man, making sure the NBA and its fans got a competitive game most times he was on
the court?
Studying under Dick Bavetta for 13 years was like pursuing a graduate degree in advanced game manipulation. He knew how to marshal the tempo and tone of a game better than any referee in the league, by far. He also knew how to take subtle-and not so subtle-cues from the NBA front office and extend a playoff series or, worse yet, change the complexion of that series.
The 2002 Western Conference Finals between the Los Angeles Lakers and the Sacramento Kings presents a stunning example of game and series manipulation at its ugliest. As the teams prepared for Game 6 at the Staples Center, Sacramento had a 3–2 lead in the series. The referees assigned to work Game 6 were Dick Bavetta, Bob Delaney, and Ted Bernhardt. As soon as the referees for the game were chosen, the rest of us knew immediately that there would be a Game 7. A prolonged series was good for the league, good for the networks, and good for the game. Oh, and one more thing: it was great for the big-market, star-studded Los Angeles Lakers.
In the pregame meeting prior to Game 6, the league office sent down word that certain calls-calls that would have benefitted the Lakers — were being missed by the referees. This was the type of not-so-subtle information that I and other referees were left to interpret. After receiving the dispatch, Bavetta openly talked about the fact that the league wanted a Game 7.
"If we give the benefit of the calls to the team that's down in the series, nobody's going to complain. The series will be even at three apiece, and then the better team can win Game 7," Bavetta stated.
As history shows, Sacramento lost Game 6 in a wild come-from-behind thriller that saw the Lakers repeatedly sent to the foul line by the referees. For other NBA referees watching the game on television, it was a shameful performance by Bavetta's crew, one of the most poorly officiated games of all time.
The 2002 series certainly wasn't the first or last time Bavetta weighed in on an important game. He also worked Game 7 of the 2000 Western Conference Finals between the Lakers and the Trail Blazers. The Lakers were down by 13 at the start of the fourth quarter when Bavetta went to work. The Lakers outscored Portland 31–13 in the fourth quarter and went on to win the game and the series. It certainly didn't hurt the Lakers that they got to shoot 37 free throws compared to a paltry 16 for the Trail Blazers.
Two weeks before the 2003–04 season ended, Bavetta and I were assigned to officiate a game in Oakland. That afternoon before the tip-off, we were discussing an upcoming game on our schedule. It was the last regular-season game we were scheduled to work, pitting Denver against San Antonio. Denver had lost a game a few weeks prior because of a mistake made by the referees, a loss that could be the difference between them making or missing the playoffs. Bavetta told me Denver needed the win and that it would look bad for the staff and the league if the Nuggets missed the playoffs by one game. There were still a few games left on the schedule before the end of the season, and the standings could potentially change. But on that day in Oakland, Bavetta looked at me and casually stated, "Denver will win if they need the game. That's why I'm on it."
I was thinking, How is Denver going to win on the road in San Antonio? At the time, the Spurs were arguably the best team in the league. Bavetta answered my question before it was asked.
"Duncan will be on the bench with three fouls within the first five minutes of the game," he calmly stated.
Bavetta went on to inform me that it wasn't the first time the NBA assigned him to a game for a specific purpose. He cited examples, including the 1993 playoff series when he put New Jersey guard Drazen Petrovic on the bench with quick fouls to help Cleveland beat the Nets. He also spoke openly about the 2002 Los Angeles–Sacramento series and called himself the NBA's "go-to guy."
As it turned out, Denver didn't need the win after all; they locked up a spot in the playoffs before they got to San Antonio. In a twist of fate, it was the Spurs that ended up needing the win to have a shot at the division title, and Bavetta generously accommodated. In our pregame meeting, he talked about how important the game was to San Antonio and how meaningless it was to Denver, and that San Antonio was going to get the benefit of the calls that night. Armed with this inside information, I called Jack Concannon before the game and told him to bet the Spurs.
To no surprise, we won big. San Antonio blew Denver out of the building that evening, winning by 26 points. When Jack called me the following morning, he expressed amazement at the way an NBA game could be manipulated. Sobering, yes; amazing, no. That's how the game is played in the National Basketball Association.
In a follow-up email to the referee staff and the league office, Crawford railed about the lack of respect players had for referees and the NBA's failure to back him up. Then, in a direct shot at the league's embracing of referees like Dick Bavetta, he fired a sharp rebuke:
"I also told [Stu Jackson] that the staff is an officiating staff of Dick Bavetta's-schmoozing and sucking people's asses to get ahead. Awful, but it is reality."
Crawford also touched on the fact that he was being excluded from working the playoffs that year:
"Look on the bright side everybody, MORE playoff games for you guys and Dick, maybe you will get to be crew chief in the 7th game of the Finals, which is a travesty in itself you even being in the Finals."
Tommy Nunez

My favorite Tommy Nunez story is from the 2007 playoffs when the San Antonio Spurs were able to get past the Phoenix Suns in the second round. Of course, what many fans didn't know was that Phoenix had someone working against them behind the scenes. Nunez was the group supervisor for that playoff series, and he definitely had a rooting interest.
Nunez loved the Hispanic community in San Antonio and had a lot of friends there. He had been a referee for 30 years and loved being on the road; in fact, he said that the whole reason he had become a group supervisor was to keep getting out of the house. So Nunez wanted to come back to San Antonio for the conference finals. Plus, he, like many other referees, disliked Suns owner Robert Sarver for the way he treated officials. Both of these things came into play when he prepared the referees for the games in the staff meetings. I remember laughing with him and saying, "You would love to keep coming back here." He was pointing out everything that Phoenix was able to get away with and never once told us to look for anything in regard to San Antonio. Nunez should have a championship ring on his finger.
Derrick Stafford and Jess Kersey

Of course, Stafford had some friends in the league, too. I worked a Knicks game in Madison Square Garden with him on February 26, 2007. New York shot an astounding 39 free throws that night to Miami's paltry eight. It seemed like Stafford was working for the Knicks, calling fouls on Miami like crazy. Isiah Thomas was coaching the Knicks, and after New York's four-point victory, a guy from the Knicks came to our locker room looking for Stafford, who was in the shower. He told us that Thomas sent him to retrieve Stafford's home address; apparently, Stafford had asked the coach before the game for some autographed sneakers and jerseys for his kids. Suddenly, it all made sense.
Referee Jess Kersey was another one of Isiah Thomas' guys. They'd talk openly on the phone as if they had known each other since childhood. Thomas even told Kersey that he was pushing to get Ronnie Nunn removed from the supervisor's job so that Kersey and Dick Bavetta could take over. This sort of thing happened all the time, and I kept waiting for a Knicks game when Stafford, Bavetta, and Kersey were working together. It was like knowing the winning lottery numbers before the drawing!
Steve Javie

And then there was the ongoing feud between Javie and 76ers superstar Allen Iverson. The rift was so bad that Philadelphia general manager Billy King often called the league office to complain about Javie's treatment of Iverson during a game.
Iverson was eventually traded to Denver, and in his first game against his former team, he was tossed after two technicals. Afterward, Iverson implied Javie had a grudge against him, saying, "I thought I got fouled on that play, and I said I thought that he was calling the game personal, and he threw me out. His fuse is real short anyway, and I should have known that I couldn't say anything anyway. It's been something personal with me and him since I got in the league. This was just the perfect game for him to try and make me look bad." The league fined Iverson $25,000 for his comments, but most of the league referees thought the punishment was too lenient and were upset he wasn't suspended. As a result, we collectively decided to dispense a little justice of our own, sticking it to Iverson whenever we could.
Shortly after the Javie-Iverson incident, I worked a Jazz-Nuggets contest in Denver on January 6, 2007. During the pregame meeting, my fellow referees Bernie Fryer and Gary Zielinski agreed that we were going to strictly enforce the palming rule against Iverson. Palming the ball was something Iverson loved to do, but if he so much as came close to a palm, we were going to blow the whistle. Obviously, our actions were in direct retaliation for Iverson's rant against Javie. True to form, I immediately excused myself and made an important phone call.
Sticking to our pregame pledge, each of us whistled Iverson for palming in the first quarter-we all wanted in on the fun. The violations seemed to affect Iverson's rhythm and he played terribly that night, shooting 5-for-19 with five turnovers. After getting repeatedly whistled all night long, Iverson approached me in an act of submission.
"How long am I going to be punished for Javie?" he quietly inquired.
"Don't know what you're talking about, Allen," I responded.

 Thank you COB

Do What You Do      Hallelujah Hollaback      ...blackhercules21...

Thursday, October 29, 2009

Rock-Paper-Scissors

Back in Part III of my "And With The First Pick" series I mentioned the classic game of Rock Paper Scissors and how I felt, in a situation where you couldn't find a decisive winner, because one team was better than another team but not both, just go with the "rock." Well here's the reason why you should always pick Rock in a Rock Paper Scissors game...because Paper can't beat Rock...and if you think it can, let's play a game...


"I understand that Scissors can beat Paper, and I get how Rock can beat Scissors, but there's no f*cking way Paper can beat Rock.  Paper is supposed to magically "wrap around" Rock, rendering it immobile? Why the hell cant paper do this to scissors?  Screw scissors, why can't paper do this to people? Why aren"t sheets of notebook paper constantly suffocating students as they attempt to take notes in class? I'll tell you why- BECAUSE PAPER CANT BEAT ANYBODY! A rock would tear that sh*t up in 2 seconds. When I play Rock-Paper-Scissors I always choose Rock.  Then when somebody claims to have beaten me with their paper, I punch them in the face with my already clenched fist and say "Oh sh*t, I'm sorry- I thought paper would protect you, @$$hole."--Unknown


Do What You Do       Hallelujah Hollaback      ...blackhercules21...

Wednesday, October 28, 2009

A Conversation with Chris Oliver

Every so often, the eurobasket website will "have a conversation" with a player about stuff pertaining to the team and just random questions they like to ask. I usually get a kick out of it because it seems like the players are caught off guard with some of the questions and give generic, unexciting answers. The first teammate of mine to have a "conversation" with the Eurobasket site was the player who won the GM challenge in last weeks blog, so go ahead and get to know my boy Chris Oliver a little better by reading the "conversation" he had with Eurobasket.


A Conversation With Chris Oliver (MEG Gottingen) - Oct 26, 2009 (by Miles Schmidt-Scheuber)
Chris Oliver (198-F-85, agency: Court Side, college: Radford) is a 24 year old 198cm forward playing his second season with MEG Goetingen. He is a athletic forward that has great hands, the versatility to play inside and outside, with three-point range on his jump shot, and has tremendous poise and maturity. He played at Radford from 2003-2007 and in his senior year, he played 30 games averaging 18.8ppg, 8.3rpg, 2.1apg, 1.9spg, 1.3bpg, FGP: 48.7%, 3Pts: 25.8%, FT: 74.8%. He came to Germany in 2007-2008 and played for the Kaiserslautern Braves of the PRO A playing 30 games: Score-2 (20.5ppg), Reb-5 (9.0rpg), 1.2apg, 1.3spg, 1.7bpg, FGP: 56%, 3PT: 25.0%, FT: 79.6%. Last season in Goettingen, he averaged 10.6ppg, 5.2rpg, 1.4spg, FGP: 46.4%, 3PT: 37.0%, FT: 75.5% in 34 games. He spoke to Eurobasket about basketball and life.

You guys had no game on Sunday. Did you have an off day, or did coach John Patrick have practice?

We had an off day. Some guys were sick and some rested so it was a good thing.

MEG Goettingen started off on a 2-2 record. The team has shown that it can score, but will it play defense as well as last season?

Yes we will. We are still trying to find our defensive rotation, but I feel that we will still be as capable of playing good defense as last season.

You were the top scorer in 3 of the first four games with more than 20 points. Are you comfortable with being the go to guy this season?


I am comfortable with this role and the go to guy is more my role this season. I worked really hard this off season on my game and it is really paying off now.

You are averaging 4,8rpg and are under your average from last season. Do you think you will get back up to the 7-8 rebound total or will the rebounding be more balanced this season.


I would like to get back to where I was last season. But we have many guys that can rebound with Jason Boone, Chris Mcnaughton, Dwayne Anderson and Taj Finger. Our guards ae also rebounding well and we just have more guys rebounding this season.

What are the biggest differences to last season? Is the guard terror not so much the focus anymore?

We still get good guard play. Ben Jacobson is scoring and setting up our offense, while Robert Kulawick is making big three pointers and Chester Fraizer and John Little are defending very well.

What is it like playing together with 8 Americans? What is the biggest advantage?



I see the advantage more off the court. I can relate to the guys and it feels like home hanging out with the Americans. But The Germans play just as well.

Will this be the year where Robert Kulawick has his break through?


I think so. He is shooting the ball really well, rebounding and defending. I hope it is his big year and as well as also for the team.

As you were the second best scorer of the PRO A in 2007-2008, did you ever think that you would have such a solid BBL rookie season despite your injury?

Yes I did. I have always been confident in my abilities. The injury did slow me down, but my self confidence was good enough to get me going.

You come from North Carolina. Not only the State of Ohio has first class basketball players, but also North Carolina. Why is that?



I am not really sure, but in North Carolina there is not too much to do, so guys just go to the gym and work out. I also think that many guys want to play at the big basketball schools as well which gets a lot of interest for basketball in the State.

Who was the best basketball player that you played against at Radford that might be in the NBA now?


Rodney Brewer of the Utah Jazz.

What do you do on an off day in Goettingen?


We relax, go out and eat and then come home and play the X box and just rest our bodies after a hard week of practice and games.

What besides family and friends do you miss most from home?


The restaurants like Olive Garden. They dont have something like that in Germany.

Who are your favorites to win the NBA title?


I am a Cavaliers fan, so I am going with them. The Lakers also have a chance, but I am not a fan of them.

Will Shaq make the difference?


I think he could. He is a big presence inside and the big wing players will take a lot of pressure off Lebron.

What was the last DVD that you saw?


The last house on the left.

Thanks Chris for the chat! Good luck this season!
Thank You.



 Do What You Do      Hallelujah Hollaback      ...blackhercules21...

Tuesday, October 27, 2009

Get Caught Up

So apparently there is some copyright b*ullsh*t with the Beko BBL and our fansite can no longer post game highlights on youtube. Not sure the accuracy of that rumor but here is the link for our team website where the highlights can be found

http://www.meggoettingen.de/herren/pages/VeilchenTV.199.php

As most of you know, my girlfriend just left so I'll need to write blogs to pass some time. On the site above you can see both highlights from Paderborn and Giessen. Those were two big home wins, we went back on the road and lost to a tough Trier team that jumped on us from the get go and our efforts to get it back fell a bit short. So we're currently 2-2 with our fifth game coming up this weekend.

There has been a (Swine?) flu outbreak in the apartment complex and I've decided to quarantine myself in my room when I'm not out at practice, so look for some good blogs coming in the next few days. Here are the stats from the past three games.

Date: October 18, 2009
Goettingen harassed Paderborn Baskets 97:70 behind 28 points from Oliver. Jacobson nailed 23 and Boone scored 12. Moore delivered 18 points for the visiting side.



MEG GOETTINGEN (Coach: Patrick, John)

Field Goals
Rebounds

#
Name
min
2pm-a
3pm-a
ftm-a
off
def
tot
ast
pf
st
bs
pts
12
Jacobson, Ben
33
2-6
6-9
1-2
2
5
7
7
2
1
1
23
23
Oliver, Chris
25
6-7
4-5
4-4
1
6
7
1
3
2
1
28
11
Little, John
21
0-0
0-3
2-2
0
4
4
2
4
0
0
2
21
Boone, Jason
18
5-6
0-0
2-2
3
3
6
0
3
0
0
12
7
McNaughton, Christopher
21
4-7
0-0
2-2
2
3
5
0
1
1
1
10
5
Kulawick, Robert
21
0-0
2-7
0-0
1
0
1
0
1
2
0
6
13
Frazier, Chester
21
0-0
0-3
2-2
1
2
3
2
3
0
0
2
22
Anderson, Dwayne
16
3-5
1-2
2-2
2
1
3
1
0
2
0
11
33
Toppert, Cody
9
0-0
1-2
0-0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
3
31
Finger, Taj
4
0-1
0-1
0-0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
8
Welzel, Tobias
3
0-1
0-1
0-0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
10
Rochestie, Taylor
3
0-0
0-0
0-0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0

Total

20-33
14-33
15-16
13
24
37
15
20
8
3
97
PADERBORN BASKETS (Coach: Stolz, Olaf)

Field Goals
Rebounds

#
Name
min
2pm-a
3pm-a
ftm-a
off
def
tot
ast
pf
st
bs
pts
9
Moore, Malik
31
1-4
4-9
4-4
0
1
1
3
4
2
0
18
23
Haynes, DeAndre
29
1-3
2-2
5-6
1
4
5
1
2
1
0
13
15
Barrett, Sefton
22
3-4
1-3
4-4
1
3
4
2
1
2
0
13
42
Terwilliger, Matt
22
0-2
1-3
0-0
0
3
3
1
2
0
0
3
4
Gerwig, Nate
21
1-1
0-0
0-0
1
0
1
0
5
1
0
2
6
Langford, Kevin
26
3-6
0-2
4-5
3
0
3
2
3
0
1
10
11
Borha, Lawrence
22
1-2
1-3
0-0
0
1
1
0
3
1
0
5
7
Lieneke, Daniel
9
0-1
0-3
4-4
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
4
40
Oehle, Robert
9
0-2
0-0
0-0
0
1
1
0
2
0
0
0
12
Huelsewede, Robert
4
1-1
0-1
0-0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
2
25
Gajda, Thomas
 DNP - Coach's Decision

Total

11-26
9-26
21-23
6
15
21
9
22
7
1
70





Date: October 20, 2009
Oliver Chris posted 21 points and Jacobson Ben brought Goettingen 18 as the latter overcame LTi 46ers 86:64. Teague David answered with 21 points for the guests and Freese Jannik scored 13 points.



LTI GIESSEN 46ERS (Coach: Bogojevic, Vladimir)
  Field Goals Rebounds  
# Name min 2pm-a 3pm-a ftm-a off def tot ast pf st bs pts
23 Teague, David 33 5-11 2-7 5-6 2 5 7 2 3 0 0 21
7 Johnson, Kevin 26 2-4 0-1 2-2 4 7 11 1 3 0 0 6
20 Weber, Max 22 0-0 0-2 0-0 0 0 0 1 4 1 0 0
21 Reed, Charles 21 1-1 0-2 0-0 1 0 1 3 0 0 0 2
11 Kohlmaier, Martin 17 0-1 0-0 4-4 1 1 2 0 3 0 1 4
32 Jeffers, Maurice 30 4-11 0-0 3-4 1 2 3 3 0 0 0 11
24 Freese, Jannik 22 5-7 0-0 3-3 1 4 5 0 2 0 0 13
4 Jacovic, Viktor 15 1-2 0-2 2-3 0 3 3 0 3 0 0 4
34 Werner, Joe 8 1-1 0-0 1-1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 3
12 Theilig, Falko 1 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
19 Christen, Robin  DNP - Coach's Decision
31 Tapuskovic, Stevan  DNP - Coach's Decision
Total   19-38 2-14 20-23 10 23 33 10 20 1 1 64


MEG GOETTINGEN (Coach: Patrick, John)
  Field Goals Rebounds  
# Name min 2pm-a 3pm-a ftm-a off def tot ast pf st bs pts
23 Oliver, Chris 31 5-7 3-9 2-2 2 2 4 2 1 2 0 21
12 Jacobson, Ben 31 6-8 2-4 0-0 1 1 2 5 3 2 0 18
21 Boone, Jason 28 4-4 0-0 4-6 2 5 7 1 4 0 1 12
11 Little, John 16 0-1 0-1 0-0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0
5 Kulawick, Robert 26 0-1 5-10 0-0 0 5 5 1 2 1 0 15
10 Rochestie, Taylor 20 4-5 1-6 1-2 0 0 0 3 1 1 0 12
13 Frazier, Chester 14 0-0 1-2 1-4 0 2 2 0 2 0 0 4
22 Anderson, Dwayne 12 0-1 0-2 0-2 2 0 2 0 3 1 0 0
7 McNaughton, Christopher 11 1-3 0-0 0-0 0 3 3 0 4 1 0 2
33 Toppert, Cody 5 1-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2
8 Welzel, Tobias 0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0
Total   21-31 12-34 8-16 8 18 26 14 21 8 1 86





Date: October 23, 2009
TBB Trier stayed among the league leaders as they held off Goettingen for the third success. Christopher Copeland poured in 30 points to pace Trier. Jamal Shuler secured 23 points and 8 boards for the winners. Chris Oliver finished with 21 points for Goettingen.

MEG GOETTINGEN (Coach: Patrick, John)

Field Goals
Rebounds

#
Name
min
2pm-a
3pm-a
ftm-a
off
def
tot
ast
pf
st
bs
pts
12
Jacobson, Ben
32
4-9
1-3
6-8
1
1
2
1
1
0
0
17
23
Oliver, Chris
29
8-10
1-3
2-3
3
2
5
0
1
1
1
21
21
Boone, Jason
24
5-7
0-0
2-3
2
6
8
0
5
0
2
12
11
Little, John
10
0-0
0-1
0-0
0
2
2
1
4
0
0
0
10
Rochestie, Taylor
32
3-5
4-8
2-2
1
1
2
5
2
0
0
20
5
Kulawick, Robert
24
0-1
1-3
0-0
0
0
0
1
5
0
0
3
13
Frazier, Chester
22
0-0
0-2
0-0
0
0
0
1
5
0
0
0
7
McNaughton, Christopher
15
4-6
0-0
3-3
0
2
2
0
1
0
1
11
22
Anderson, Dwayne
5
0-0
1-2
0-0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
3
33
Toppert, Cody
3
0-0
0-1
0-0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
8
Welzel, Tobias
 DNP - Coach's Decision

Total

24-38
8-23
15-19
7
14
21
9
25
1
4
87
TBB TRIER (Coach: Defraigne, Yves)

Field Goals
Rebounds

#
Name
min
2pm-a
3pm-a
ftm-a
off
def
tot
ast
pf
st
bs
pts
34
Copeland, Christopher
39
3-5
5-10
9-10
1
1
2
5
3
0
2
30
45
Shuler, Jamal
33
3-6
5-7
2-2
1
7
8
1
2
0
0
23
14
Brown, Brian
32
4-6
0-2
5-9
1
6
7
4
2
0
0
13
21
Evans, George
19
0-1
0-0
1-2
2
0
2
1
5
0
1
1
13
Gillingham, James
11
0-2
1-1
0-0
0
1
1
2
2
0
0
3
5
Raivio, Derek
29
1-3
1-3
5-6
2
1
3
4
1
0
0
10
4
Shtein, Maksym
16
5-6
0-0
0-0
3
0
3
0
3
0
0
10
33
Pekovic, Miladin
12
1-1
0-1
2-3
1
2
3
3
1
0
0
4
24
Zirbes, Maik
3
0-0
0-0
0-0
0
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
12
Karamatskos, Kosta
1
0-0
0-0
0-0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
31
Andreev, Alexander
 DNP - Coach's Decision

Total

17-30
12-24
24-32
11
19
30
20
20
0
3
94


Do What You Do      Hallelujah Hollaback      ...blackhercules21...

Sunday, October 25, 2009

And With The First Pick...The Winner Is...

First off, I'd like to thank you all for participating in this series and let you know that this will not be the last time I seek your involvement for my blog..however, next time I'm going to make sure I get all the responses in one place because I was literally tallying up votes from emails, facebook posts, facebook messages and blog posts. But enough about my labor, I guess it's about time we determine a winner huh? Here are the results...

Part 1: NCAA Team...
Winner: Team A managed by Ben Jacobson
(1)Chris Paul (2)Dwayne Wade (3)Kevin Durant (4)Michael Beasley (5) Andrew Bogut

What You Said:Team A, Beasley and Durant are just matchup nightmares.--Eric Melendez

Team A would kill. CP3 would have a field day dishing to Wade and Durant. Durant would rain treyballs all day off CP3 and DW driving and kicking--Dereck Okolie


Part 2: Foreigners...
Winner: Team B managed by John Little
(1)Steve Nash (2)Manu Ginobli (3)Mickael Pietrus (4)Toni Kukoc (5)Dirk Nowitzski
What You Said: "Team B is the best.. Nash over Parker, Ginobli over Fernandez, and I really think Pietrus can lock up AK-47, he is just to soft for me.... Gasol n Ming will take Kukoc n Dirk"--Jalil Abdur Rahman


Part 3: Whiteboys...
Winner: Team C managed by Ben Jacobson
(1) John Stockton (2) Mark Price (3) Larry Bird (4) Bob Pettit (5) Bill Walton
What You Said: This is hard...a lot of these white dudes played way back in the day so it is hard to think about how good they are compared to Stockton and Bird and guys like that who played against a more diverse league (yeah, and by diverse I mean blacker).
Lenny Wilkens is obviously is the best coach. Doc was gonna get fired until he got 2 future HOFer's w/KG and Ray Allen and won a ring. However, Doc's squad here has 2, maybe 3 of the top 5 white, US born players ever (Stockton, Bird, healthy Bill Walton). So I will have to go with Team C as the best (followed by Team B, then A).
-
-Ryan McAdam


Part 4: Highschoolers
Winner: Team B managed by Chris Oliver
(1) Sebastian Telfair (2) Lebron James (3) Tracy McGrady (4) Amare Stoudemire (5) Dwight Howard
What You Said: Team B without a doubt.. Kobe may give Lebron a problem but Kemp isn't holdin McGrady. Because McGrady didn't get wack until later into his season with the Rockets. D-Howard aka you.. Probably the best 5 man in the league today but he was nasty at this time too and would eat Bynum alive. too many weapons on team B. Team C stand for Team Chillout because they only have Garnett... Felt bad and Smith can't shoot for his life. Only bangers yo so team B 100%-- Malcolm Boone


Part 5: #1 Draft Picks
Winner: Team A managed by Chris Oliver
(1) Oscar Robertson (2) Lebron James (3) Chris Webber (4) Tim Duncan (5) Kareem Abdul-Jabbar


What You Said: Gotta go with Team A. Oscar is too big for AI to guard, LeBaron is too big for GRob to guard. Web, Timmy and Kareem would BATTLE with The Dream, Shaq Fu and The Admiral. This is a game that I would definitely pay to watch. Benjamin Button (Mr. Oden), Joe Budden (Ms. Trina aka Kenyon) & co. would get blown out.--Derick Okolie


Part 6: Streetballing
Winner: Team B managed by Chris Oliver
(1) Baron Davis (2) Kobe Bryant (3) Carmelo Anthony (4) Blake Griffin (5) Kevin Garnett
What You Said: Team B 'cause bdiddy brings the show and the mamba gonna kill when the game is on the line.--Jan Schiecke



Part 7: Brawlers
Winner: Team C managed by John Little
(1) John Starks (2) Rick Mahorn (3) Ron Artest (4) Charles Oakley (5) Ben Wallace
What You Said: Team C. Oaktree, Ron-Ron and Mahorn are Goons. Ben ain't messed with too and Starks was always edgy. Give them Bill Laimbeer as the sixth man and i would be scared to death.--Jan Schiecke
Team C...no doubt about that. All Killer, no filler--Bjorn Lars-Blank







Just incase you can't add...the winner for the "And With The First Pick" Blog Series was

...drum roll please...





Chris Oliver


...look out for the next series coming soon, and see if Chris can defend his title

Do What You Do      Hallelujah Hollaback      ...blackhercules21...

Friday, October 23, 2009

And With The First Pick: FINALE

I couldn't have scripted it better if I tried. After six days, all three of my teammates have two wins. I didn't want anyone picking teams by their favorite teammate of mine, so the "teams" (a, b, and c) didn't actually correspond to a teammate of mine. But in either case, we need to find an actual winner, so we're going to do what my dad said I never had to do, and that's "duke it out." I think he only said that because he secretly wanted to beat people up for me. Actually I guess when you go around telling people you can and will beat them up, it's not a secret. Shout outs to Greg Boone.


Anyway, it's time for a winner. If you haven't voted all week I need you to vote today, if you don't vote today, Greg Boone might whoop your ass. Today, the GM's had to pick a team, where if the game was getting physical, and a brawl broke out, they would have the last man standing. For this one we're going back to anyone who has ever played an NBA game and hopefully, we'll finally get a winner. Make Sure You Vote for the team that would win the brawl.



Team A
1) Chris Childs
2) Matt Barnes
3) Stephen Jackson
4) Kenyon Martin
5) Shaquille O'Neal


Team B
1) Vernon Maxwell

2) Anthony Peeler

3) Charles Barkley

4) Anthony Mason


Team C

1) John Starks

2) Rick Mahorn

3) Ron Artest

4) Charles Oakley

5) Ben Wallace




Do What You Do       Hallelujah Hollaback      ...blackhercules21...